healthcare vs money

World spend more on health care, but have shorter life

Countries spend more on health, but people still pay a lot out of pocket

Health spending is growing faster than the rest of the world economy, which is approximately 10% of total domestic product (GDP). A new World Health Organization (WHO) report on global health spending shows a rapidly growing path of health spending around the world, especially in low- and middle -income countries, where care spending health is growing at an average rate of 6% per year. In high -income countries, 4%.

Health care expenditures include government spending, own contributions (people paying for care), and resources such as voluntary health insurance, medical programs provided by employers, and activity of non-governmental organizations.

The government pays an average of 51% of a country’s health costs, and more than 35% of each country’s health costs are covered at its own expense. The result is that 100 million people live in extreme poverty every year.

The report highlights the growing trend in public health funding in low and middle income countries and the decline of external funding in middle income countries. Confidence in self -spending is declining around the world, albeit slowly.

“Increasing domestic spending is critical to achieving global health and sustainable health-related development goals,” Drs. Tetras Adanom Gebreizus, WHO Director General. “But spending on health care is not spending, it invests in poverty reduction, job creation, productivity, along with economic growth, and a healthier, safer and fairer society.

In middle -income countries, public spending on health since 2000 has doubled. On average, the government spends $ 60 per capita. A person who provides health care in low and middle income countries and about $ 270 per person in middle income countries.

As public health costs rise, people are likely to fall into poverty and seek medical attention. However, public spending reduces access inequalities only when funding is carefully planned so that all residents have access to primary health care.

For low- and middle -income countries, new data shows that more than half of health care spending is spent on primary health care. However, less than 40% of all major health care costs are borne by governments.

“All 194 WHO member states recognized the importance of primary health care with the adoption of the Astana Declaration in October,” said Drs. Agnes Size, Director-General of WHO for Health, Management and Economics. “They must respond to this statement and prioritize the use of quality health care in the community.”

The report also examines the role of external financing. With rising domestic spending, the share of foreign aid has fallen to less than 1% of global health spending. Almost half of these external factors are caused by three diseases: HIV / AIDS, tuberculosis (tuberculosis) and malaria.

Although the report clearly shows the transition from middle -income countries to financing internal health care systems, external assistance is still important for many countries, especially countries with low income.

A new WHO report shows how politicians, health professionals and citizens can further strengthen health systems.

“Health is a human right, and all countries must prioritize efficient and effective primary health care as a means to achieve global health and sustainable development goals,” Sukat concluded.

List of countries that spends most on Healthcare.

1. United States
• Money spent on public health: $8,047 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 14.0%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 2.6 per 1,000 people (in 2016)
• Life expectancy at birth: 78.7 years
• Population: 325,719,178

2. Luxembourg
• Money spent on public health: $5,506 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 5.3%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 3.0 per 1,000 people (in 2017)
• Life expectancy at birth: 82.3 years
• Population: 599,449

3. Norway
• Money spent on public health: $5,399 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 8.9%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 4.7 per 1,000 people (in 2017)
• Life expectancy at birth: 82.5 years
• Population: 5,282,223

4. Switzerland
• Money spent on public health: $5,030 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 7.7%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 4.3 per 1,000 people (in 2016)
• Life expectancy at birth: 82.9 years
• Population: 8,466,017

5. Germany
• Money spent on public health: $4,869 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 9.6%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 4.2 per 1,000 people (in 2016)
• Life expectancy at birth: 80.6 years
• Population: 82,695,000

6. Sweden
• Money spent on public health: $4,606 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 9.3%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 4.3 per 1,000 people (in 2015)
• Life expectancy at birth: 82.2 years
• Population: 10,067,744

7. Netherlands
• Money spent on public health: $4,378 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 8.8%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 0.0 per 1,000 people (in 0)
• Life expectancy at birth: 81.5 years
• Population: 17,132,854

8. Denmark
• Money spent on public health: $4,363 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 8.7%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 3.7 per 1,000 people (in 2015)
• Life expectancy at birth: 80.7 years
• Population: 5,769,603

9. France
• Money spent on public health: $4,068 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 9.6%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 3.4 per 1,000 people (in 2017)
• Life expectancy at birth: 82.3 years
• Population: 67,118,648

10. Austria
• Money spent on public health: $4,044 per capita
• Share of GDP spent on public health: 7.7%
• Primary care and specialist doctors: 5.1 per 1,000 people (in 2016)
• Life expectancy at birth: 80.9 years
• Population: 8,809,212

The Data collection Method

To identify the countries that spend the most on healthcare 24/7, Tempo analyzed OECD data on healthcare costs. Expenditure figures for 2017 last year for data. Countries that spent more than $3,000 per person on health care in 2017 were selected. Additional information about the national health system is obtained from national and national sources. Commonwealth Foundation. The annual health expenditure and the number of physicians per capita when broken down by the country’s gross domestic product are also from the OECD.

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